Author Archives: Not Like a Cat

Summer Favorite: Buffalo Kale Pizza Recipe

What would you do with a big box of organic baby kale? What would you do with four of them?

For a recent campaign for Stonyfield Yogurt in partnership with Taylor Farms organic greens (for which I was compensated and received product), I realized that when you have a lot of Whole Milk Greek and Whole Milk Smooth and Creamy yogurt and baby greens (Power Greens: Baby Kale, in my case), I came up with three recipe ideas.*

The first two — true to how I usually cook — don’t have actual recipes. I made a delicious pasta with baby kale, garlic, and Greek yogurt (I put the baby kale in with the spaghetti near the end of cooking time, then tossed all that with olive oil in which I’d cooked some chopped/minced garlic and red pepper flakes, then stirred in Greek yogurt — so good, though chopping the kale first would have been a good idea, as even the baby kale stems can be…chewy). 

Then I made a yogurt-based garlicky herb dressing to toss on the raw baby kale leaves.

And then, dear friends, I had the most wonderful idea of all: Buffalo Kale Pizza. I didn’t come up with that name myself; my friend Diana did. I’ve been on a big homemade pizza kick this summer. I make a batch of Mark Bittman’s pizza dough (whole wheat, and so easy!), then I have dough to make pizza whenever I want.

I make pizza on the grill. I make it in my oven, if it’s not a sweltering day. I have even made it in the toaster oven when I just wanted a small pizza for which it would have been hot and wasteful to heat oven or grill.

homemade whole wheat pizza dough from Mark Bittman's Easiest Pizza dough recipe

homemade pizza dough

So on a Friday night, after yoga, I invited Diana to come over for pizza, as neither of us had any plans. She brought some fresh-picked lettuces from her window box garden and some mushrooms while I rolled out dough.
Diana made a pizza with tomato sauce, mushrooms, and mozzarella. I wanted to use tomato sauce, blue cheese, baby kale, chopped yellow sweet peppers, and mozzarella.

Buffalo Baby Kale Pizza, before baking

While the pizza cooked, I had an idea for topping mine. I put some Stonyfield Smooth and Creamy Whole Milk Plain Yogurt in a bowl, shook some red chili pepper flakes on it, then poured some hot sauce into it, before whisking it with a fork.

My pizza came out of the oven.

Buffalo Baby Kale Pizza, after baking

Looks so much prettier after the drizzle of sauce, right?

Buffalo Baby Kale Pizza, with hot-sauce drizzle

post-yoga pizza-making

Behold, homemade pizza and grown-a-mile-away lettuce! And while eating a slice of the pizza I’d made, Diana realized that the combo of blue cheese and creamy tang and hot sauce reminded her of…Buffalo wings. Except this wasn’t wings. This was homemade Buffalo Baby Kale Pizza.

So: Not exactly a recipe, more a method, because that’s how I cook. But I’ll do my best:

    1. Preheat oven with pizza stone, or grill, or just oven because you’re going to use a pan.
    2. Roll out/stretch pizza dough.
    3. Roughly chop a pile of baby kale and toss with a little olive oil so it doesn’t merely crisp up and dry out in the oven. Chop sweet pepper (yellow or red) if using.
    4. Prepare dough for toppings.**
    5. Spread thin layer of tomato sauce over dough.
    6. Sprinkle chopped oiled kale, peppers, and chunks of blue cheese onto sauced dough.
    7. Scatter mozzarella on top, followed by a little grated Parmesan.
    8. Bake pizza (timing depends on cooking method).
    9. While pizza bakes, put whole milk yogurt in a bowl. Sprinkle with hot pepper flakes, then add hot sauce. Whisk with fork.
    10. When pizza has been removed from oven, drizzle the hot yogurt sauce over it. Cut and eat.

*So…I was supposed to come up with and share a salad idea. Sorry! But really, you’ll be very happy with the Buffalo Baby Kale Pizza and you don’t even need a salad with it! You’re welcome. #efficiency

** Grilling: Throw flattened dough on grill for 5-8 minutes, then flip onto peel/cutting board to put toppings on grilled side.
Baking with pizza stone: Move flattened dough onto a pizza peel sprinkled with cornmeal.
Baking without pizza stone: Move flattened dough to a rimmed sheet pan that’s either been greased lightly with olive oil or sprinkled with cornmeal.

Mt. Washington Road Race: Recap

Last Saturday, I ran up Mt. Washington (getting an entry is a feat unto itself, then you have to run 7.6 miles uphill with a 4696′ vertical gain (assume your half marathon time and maybe a touch more). At the start, I heard people sharing their strategy: run the first three miles, then walk/run. Walk/run the whole way. Power-walk it.

Running is good for you, and so is oral hygiene. Slightly terrifying inflatable tooth race mascot by Northeast Delta Dental.

My ultrarunning crowd says to walk the hills; you’re going the same speed as anyone running it, but conserving energy. I tried this and passed a lot of people (I walked, they ran).

“We need to run up to there.” Photo credit: Rick Ando

Due to injury, I’d been unable to train. I don’t mean training on hills. I mean running at all. Two miles into any run, my tendonitis kicked in. I gave up months ago and knew this race — this getting to the finish line — would be a crapshoot.

Anyway, it’s up up up, no break, no flats, just up. At least it was shady for the first three or so miles (fact: I’ve done a lot of hiking in the Whites but have only been up Mt. Washington once, on foot, in winter, never by the auto road).

Occasionally, after mile five, I gave my calf injury a break and walked backwards a lot (hey, guy who said the relief was “all in my head,” nope. It was real. It gave my calf a rest and used my quads for a change and then maybe I passed you, but even if I didn’t, well, walking up backwards gave my injury some rest, so…).

Around mile 5, soon after that section of dirt road started (slightly steeper), I stuffed in one earbud and turned on my iPod shuffle to “Defying Gravity.” I tried to sing along but had little lungs left at that point. A guy in a Reykjavik Marathon t-shirt said, “Good for you!” as I tried to choke out the words. But what I thought about was me, defying gravity, taking a leap after way too long to save myself.

Up, up, up…Photo credit: Rick Ando

I looked over the edge of that mountain road, suffering and wishing for it to stop, and I recognized how much strength I have summoned over the past year and how much I’ve had to turn away from and hold my head high, and how much I’ve given up and just how much I have gained.

I thought about how calm and happy I am now, and how hard I have fought for that.

I ran as hard as I could, give the circumstances — OK, I walked. And yes, I got badly sunburned in the process. It’s a metaphor. I can survive this burn. I can survive this endless hill that is a metaphor for everything right now. I am strong enough.

At some point, slightly dizzy and hoping for a break (I don’t do well with sun and heat), I sat down on a rock and put my head down between my legs. A person in our group (with whom I’d started, he having done the race several times and planning to take it slow, me having no idea what to expect from myself and intending to go it alone), came by and said “hi.” I felt obliged to get up and walk/run with him for a while, but his race strategy wasn’t mine, and I let him go on ahead.

Turns out before he’d come upon me on my rock, he’d come upon another person in our group, also untrained and sitting on a rock. And he got him back up running, too.

Photo credit: Rick Ando

I was going to get up again, anyway. I always do. I knew there’s no exit on the Mt. Washington Road Race. I wasn’t about to hang out in the blaring sun on the side of the road waiting for the road to re-open so I could hitch a ride. I knew I’d get up there to the top.

Eventually, near the very very end, the road leveled out for about two-tenths of a mile, and it was glorious, and I saw some of our group.

Then I looked up. It was only about four minutes of hell in front of me, but it was some seriously steep road (steep) that I had to get up before I could cross the finish line.

Did I dive deep and run up that hill and switchback to get there?

up up and away! Photo credit: Rick Ando

Hell no. I was sunburned and hot and had a terrible dehydration headache, despite drinking at every single water stop, and I decided that since I wouldn’t make the sub-two-hour mark, forget it. I’d get there when I got there.

Slog, slog, slog…Photo credit: Rick Ando

Then for the last 30 feet or so (I could be wrong about that distance) it was somewhat level and I managed to run to get myself across the beautiful finish line.

There I am (yellow visor)! Almost done! Photo credit: Rick Ando

Finally done!! Photo credit: Rick Ando

And that, dear people, is what it is like to run up the Mt. Washington Auto Road in blazing sun on a warm day when you are injured and haven’t been able to train and are going through a lot, life-wise.

The only other time I’ve summited Mt. Washington was in the middle of winter, and we came up Lion Head trail with snowshoes and crampons, and it was cold and snowy and beautiful, and we were careful to keep an eye on each other for signs of hypothermia — a very different scenario.

Do I want to do it again? Yes. 

97-year-old going up Mt. Washington Auto Road; apparently he participates in the race every year

(With more sun protection next time…)

Ugh. Just, ugh. Too hot for a shirt, but I wasn’t expecting so much exposure! Oops.

Ahhhhh….

 

Changes

Today I took the kids to visit our new town.

I don’t want to jinx anything, but I’m supposed to close on a house July 14.

This has taken major effort. I had to figure out which towns I could afford around here (hint: not many). How far in what direction it made sense to be (for several reasons, but in great part due to my ex-husband’s job, as we need to stay within half an hour of each other).

Then, I had to talk to school staff, SEPAC (Special Education Parent Advisory Council) people, parents with kids in the schools, and so on. Loaded with information and recommendations, I zeroed in on a town near a town my ex-husband wanted to move to.

Time to get pre-approved for a mortgage. Our current town is overcrowded (in terms of schools, and certainly in terms of after-school programs), and we haven’t been able to get a spot in any of the school or town after-school programs (this year was so bad that many of the programs, at registration time, warned they couldn’t accept any new families but could only put them on a waiting list…and some families who had spots last year didn’t get spots this year. It’s bad.).

Anyway, this means we haven’t been able to work regular full-time hours. School pick-up is at 2:30 except on Tuesdays, when it is 1 p.m. Yeah. I work full days on my ex’s custody days, and he works full days on my custody days, and the rest of the time…short days.

Fortunately, my job is flexible and my boss is very understanding, and she works around my schedule so that if I can start work at 5 a.m. some days, she’ll give me assignments ahead of time (I’m a freelance editor in the glamorous world of educational publishing). And I take on extra clients when I can, working nights or very early mornings.

Anyway. Despite my part-time hours, I managed to get pre-approved for a mortgage. I had exactly one week from having my offer accepted to get an inspection and complete my mortgage application (people, let me tell you, it’s a lot of paperwork to download and present!).

The seller was/is fast-tracking the sale. I decided I could keep up the pace. So far, so good.

I’ve hinted to the kids but at this point it’s close to a done deal (*fingers crossed*) and today I brought them out to see their new town/the new house.

They were so excited that they got into the car three hours early and buckled in. OK, then. We drove to the new town and got lunch at the Mexican restaurant (there’s only one. And they’re strong with the upsell game. And the food is mediocre). Then I showed them the ancient diner, and we went to the candy store, where I bought them their first Pop Rocks (yes!! Pop Rocks!! Sugar/dye/artificial flavor/have fun, kids!).

Then we went to the mill pond to fish for awhile, then it was time to see the house.

They love it. There was the SLIGHTEST touch of disappointment that they’d be sharing a room (as they have for life so far), but they loved the bathroom (??) and the yard and the fact that the bedrooms are upstairs (“I’ve always WANTED a house with an upstairs and a downstairs!”), and they’re very excited about owning our own home for the first time.

As in, we can dig in the yard. We can put in wall-mounted shelves. We can paint the walls.

It will be ours.

They’re so happy about it. Then we rented a canoe to paddle on the river, then we got ice cream (their first soft-serve, somehow). Then we got home and I let the younger boy haul the charcoal grill out of the basement, even though I was cooking on our little trusty propane grill, and they roasted marshmallows on the coals for s’mores.

So yeah, we didn’t go camping this weekend, but we did what we needed to.

 

One Race Down…by which I mean, down…

Tonight I set out for a very optimistic 4-miler, fueled by earfuls of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Hole and Lady Gaga. It would have been my longest run since early March. I’ve tried. I went through PT. I stretched and did things with the band (wow, that sounds much more…intriguing… than it actually was) and did those weird specific PT exercises.

See, this year I got into not one but two hard-to-get-into races, two weeks apart. The first one is a half marathon whose registration closes about 20 minutes after it opens. The second is by lottery. Somehow, I got into both.

I underwent a few Graston sessions by my trusted PT, who apparently thinks I have no pain boundaries (um, dude, we need to talk). It helped a lot (though it brought me to tears at least once).

I wasn’t fully better, but things were much improved.

Then I stepped on broken glass. Barefoot.

I did my best to remove what I could, using a clean razor blade. My brother tried (very briefly) to help get the last bit out. Then my mom insisted I go to the ER (it was a Saturday night).

The first doc couldn’t find it so she went for “the pro,” as she called him. He couldn’t find it, either, and wanted to send me for X-rays.

We had a little chat about the realities of our current healthcare system for self-insured people, after which he agreed that I could skip the X-rays and go home and would be able to tell in a few days if the remaining bit was still in there or if I had, in fact, managed to get it all out.

I think it’s all out. I’m quite certain. But the ball of my foot does feel as though four different people were fishing around in there with sharp instruments, leaving an actual hole. (Yes, there’s a hole.)

I’m doing OK and can walk pretty well now, especially with cushioning, so I thought it was time to try a run.

Well. In short, things are still broken. The calf injury spoke up first, two miles in, so I walked a little, then tried running again. It was ok, but then the foot injury kicked in. Not unbearable, but then the calf again, so I walked. Then the foot became really hard to walk on. 

So. It’s Wednesday. The race is Sunday (the half marathon). I’d be a flaming idiot to attempt it, even just walking, because even if the calf held up, the foot injury would cause me to change my gait, which would lead to yet another injury.

I’ve decided to accept this (I think!!). I will still go to Vermont and have a beautiful weekend and be with friends. And maybe by sitting this one out, I can get (SLOWLY) to the finish line of the next race.

I’m going to be smart about this. Right? Aren’t I? Feel free to chime in with supportive reminders about how skipping this race will not be the end of the world. Thanks!

Stonyfield, prAna, and #TheWholeYou (well, the whole ME!)

I have long espoused the virtues of full-fat dairy products. They’re more natural. We need fat in our diets. They taste better. So many reasons! And skim milk seems weird to me. My kids have never had skim milk and have rarely had low-fat milk, only when we are visiting someone else’s house.

These views have now become mainstream. Many new studies are showing that full-fat dairy is the better choice, for everything from staying lean to normal cholesterol levels to lower sugar intake to reduced incidences of type 2 diabetes.

Oh, and it tastes a heck of a lot better than the low-fat stuff!

Whoops, bought French Vanilla instead of plain, but that’s OK!

Diet

One thing I’ve always liked is whole milk yogurt, especially whole milk Greek yogurt. It’s so much tastier than lowfat or 0% (ugh). My kids like it too, especially as a bedtime snack: plain whole milk yogurt with a drizzle of maple syrup on it. If they’re going to have a bedtime snack, I know a dose of fat and protein will keep them sated through the night!

Exercise

A healthy diet makes me feel whole. So does exercise, even more so. And so does supporting companies whose values I share, such as prAna. My favorite climbing pants have always been prAna, and I use some of their gear for yoga, too. For this campaign I was given the opportunity to get the Dreaming Tankini in Pink Riviera. I like my body and like wearing bikinis (even though, to be honest, I’m at my heaviest and least-fit condition in over a decade), but you know what’s even better? Not having to deal with a ton of sunscreen on this pale, pale skin. So covering up a little with UPF 50 is awesome.

 

Of course, I’ll still need to sunscreen my upper back unless I want a really cool web-pattern burn from the beautiful back on the tankini:

I recently got another prAna top for yoga with the same back web–I’ve gotten so many compliments on it!

Discount Code: 

Some of my fellow Stonyfield ambassadors chose a beautiful dress or pants. You can get a discount of 15% now through the end of May on an prAna item with this code: WHOLES17NLC. 

Enjoy! And be #TheWholeYou

 

 

 

Easy Tasty Angel Hair From an Empty Pantry

The cupboards are bare. Or nearly so. My kids haven’t been here the past few days, and I’ve been very lazy about grocery shopping. I’ve lately been living on flatbread (locally-made flatbread which I top with homemade arugula pesto, whatever veggies I have on hand, maybe some diced tofu, and cheese) as well as eggs.

But I don’t feel like going to the grocery store at 8 p.m. on a Saturday night. So I grubbed around and realize I have the ingredients for three great meals tonight:

    1. Spring rolls (filled with tofu, carrots, cilantro, and bean sprouts, as I recently sprouted a bunch of mung beans). I happen to have a bunch of spring roll wrappers, rice vermicelli, and a sweet chili dipping sauce.
    2. Stir-fried bean sprouts on rice. Probably tasty, but not at all what I’m in the mood for.
    3. Angel hair with the last few tired cherry tomatoes, (jarred) garlic, fresh parsley, and fresh Parmesan. That sounds like the most appealing (and low-effort) option right now.

I went with option #3…easy comfort food. Much needed, today.

So here’s how you make yourself a quick, easy dinner with no recipe and very little on hand. And I’m sorry that all the images are sideways/upside-down. New plugin, see.

Get a pot of salted water boiling. Meanwhile, heat olive oil in a skillet. Add a glob of jarred garlic if that’s all you have, or a pile of minced fresh garlic if your pantry is better stocked than mine.

Chop up your last tired cherry tomatoes. Toss them into the skillet. If you have some remaining fresh spinach leaves, add them, too. Add any other leftover veggies you might have; I had steamed broccoli in the fridge, so I put in a few florets and mashed them as best I could.

Squeeze in a healthy dose of tomato paste and half as much anchovy paste. These are things that you should have in your fridge at all times, even if you run out of bread and milk and beans and everything else.

Stir it around. Add about half a cup of the pasta cooking water to the skillet.

Drain the pasta. Add it to the skillet, tossing everything around. Let the extra water cook off.

Shower it all with a pile of freshly-grated Parmesan. If you need to use pre-grated cheese, I understand and won’t judge, but do yourself a favor and grate it fresh if you can.

Because you’re worth it and had the absolutely shittiest and most disappointing race/run of your life today, because you ignored your tight calves and sore creaky Achilles and went into a six-hour trail race on ice/snow/mud with very little training,

and at mile 4 your calf pain shifts to a sharp Achilles pain and you know the day is over, and you are at this point down to a T-shirt and capris (no hat or gloves or any warm layer tied around your waist) and it’s 40 degrees out and you try to shortcut back through a snowy bramble field,

possibly crying with anger and disappointment, and when you’re back on trail, scratched and bleeding and limping and shivering, you reassure concerned passing runners that you’re fine and making your way back to the start/finish, and one woman looks extra-concerned and you burst into tears because THIS IS YOUR FAULT,

and she turns around and walks back along the course with you and is very kind and doesn’t even attempt a hug until you’ve gotten yourself under control and are able to recognize that you knew going into this race you had some physical issues you’ve been ignoring and at least this time you didn’t run through the pain but instead stopped when it felt significant, and then you hugged and thanked her and sent her on her way,

and because you drove four other 6-hour runners to the race, so you had to wait around another five-plus hours in the cold drizzle waiting for everyone else to finish.

anyway, toast some bread crumbs in olive oil and toss them in with the pasta. It is delightful. You deserve it. Sprinkle some fresh chopped parsley on it if you have it.

Sprinkle salt over all of it.

While it’s good and hot, eat it. Unless you are me, in which case you realize your younger son’s hamster, in his new hamster ball, has been too quiet for too long, and you discover this:

Where is the hamster??!?

Eat your cold pasta, after you finally catch and re-cage the hamster. It will still be tasty.

 

Print Recipe
Empty-Pantry Easy Angel Hair
Haven't shopped in awhile? Make this easy, healthy angel hair with what's in your fridge and pantry! Angel hair with tomatoes, spinach, and Parmesan.
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
  2. Heat 1-2 T olive oil in a skillet.
  3. When the oil is hot, add the garlic. Saute for 1-2 minutes.
  4. Add chopped tomatoes. Add spinach if you have it. Sautee 1-2 minutes
  5. Add broccoli and smash with your spatula.
  6. Add a squeeze of anchovy paste and twice as much tomato paste.
  7. When pasta is done, splash about half a cup of the pasta water into the skillet before you drain the pasta.
  8. Heat oil in another skillet. When hot, add bread crumbs and toss until lightly toasted.
  9. Add drained pasta to the skillet. Toss with tongs. Keep on heat long enough to evaporate extra water.
  10. Shower with grated Parmesan and fresh chopped parsley. Add toasted bread crumbs and toss.
Share this Recipe
 

Step Right Up! Circus 1903 Is in Boston (Review)

Two nights ago my children and I ventured into Boston to the historic and lovely old Wang Theater (now called the Boch Center) to see the circus. The circus? Yes! Circus 1903! More “Cirque de Soleil” than Ringling Brothers, this show imagines how the circus used to be.

Oh, just one of the fancy emergency exits. #WangTheater #BochCenter #Circus1903 Photo credit: Itsnotlikeacat

You should see what these guys can do when they get airborne! Photo credit: Mark Turner

But instead of clowns and trick ponies and dancing bears, the audience is treated with acrobats; “foot juggling” (think acro-yoga times 1000); aerialists tossing each other through the air (“is he really going to catch her by her ankles?!?”); a gorgeous aerial hoop performance by a former rhythmic gymnastics world champion who, like some of her fellow performers, has previously performed with Cirque de Soleil; and a spectacular juggler.

Photo credit: Mark Turner

We can’t leave out the Cycling Cyclone, who inspires me to get my single-speed bike…working again, at least. I will not be doing handstands while cycling backwards anytime soon. Or the balancing guy, “The Sensational Sozonov,” who I kind of expected to come tumbling down at any second. Bikes also appeared in the Los Lopez highwire act, which practically started with someone riding a bike across a highwire while another person got on the stunt pegs and then did a handstand on the handlebars…and it went from there (“Mom! I have stunt pegs on my bike!” “Child, I’m so glad you’re inspired. What are you going to start practicing first?”).

Please don’t fall!! Photo Credit: Mark Turner

That’s the beauty and reality of a circus on opening night. You get the sense that things are still being perfected, which makes it beautifully real. I think there was an actual stumble or two during the show overall, a great reminder to all of us that these performers work hard and have to practice.

While the show does have something of a storyline, I was too caught up in the physical feats to notice. The ringmaster occasionally called children up on stage. I’d say that encouraging your children to get on stage might not be ideal for kids under age 6 unless they handle surprises and strangers well and have a good sense of humor.

As for humor, my older child found the show amazing and hilarious (when it was funny); my younger son didn’t seem to notice the humor, but he was still mesmerized by the show.

Oh! The elephants! How could I not tell you about them? The elephants are life-sized, a mother and a baby! They look very real, but they are entirely human-powered. They are so beautiful that I wanted to cry. They are moved and supported entirely by puppeteers. You should go see Circus 1903 if only to see the elephants (though you’ll be delighted to all the show has to offer).

So beautiful, this elephant. Photo credit: Mark Turner

Baby elephant. Photo credit: Mark Turner

The show only runs through March 12, so don’t miss your chance! Go this weekend! I have a discount code for you. See below.

Discounts:

Save 25% on tickets to see CIRCUS 1903 – The Golden Age of Circus  at the Boch Wang Theatre!  Visit  http://www.bochcenter.org/buy/show-listing/circus-1903  and enter code MOMS to buy your discounted tickets.  Discount applies to all performances, while supplies last. Valid on all levels, excluding Orchestra Pit.

Stonyfield Is Now a Certified B Corp!

In news that should surprise no one, Stonyfield Yogurt is now a certified B corp. In short, this means that they have been certified to be socially and environmentally responsible, using their for-profit business for social good.

In becoming a B corp, Stonyfield joins more than 1600 other companies who have already been certified. According to BCorporation.net, “B Corp is to business what Fair Trade certification is to coffee or USDA Organic certification is to milk.”

Stonyfield joins companies such as King Arthur Flour, Pete & Gerry’s Organics (eggs), Purely Elizabeth (granolas and cereals), Preserve (household products made from recycled plastic), Method (dish soap and other cleaning products), Pukka (tea), Warby Parker, and Patagonia.

To celebrate, Stonyfield sent me a basket of treats from some of their fellow B corps: sprouted whole-wheat flour from King Arthur, a toothbrush from Preserve, Method hand soap, Pete & Gerry’s eggs, Purely Elizabeth granola, and Pukka turmeric tea.

Congratulations, Stonyfield!

Step Right Up! CIRCUS 1903 Is Coming to Town! #Giveaway

I love a good old-fashioned circus. All those acrobatics and feats of strength and daring, high-wire acts and juggling and everything! Fortunately, a really cool circus is coming to Boston (and other cities) in a few weeks: CIRCUS 1903 – The Golden Age of Circus.

The producers of the world’s biggest magic show, The Illusionists have teamed up with the award winning puppeteers from War Horse to present a thrilling turn of the century circus spectacular…

…Sensational puppetry puts Elephants back in the ring as never seen before by introducing the largest-ever performing African elephant and her baby [NOT REAL — the elephants are puppets!], along with a huge cast of the most unique, amazing and dangerous circus acts from all four corners of the world, from strong men to contortionists, acrobats to musicians, knife throwers, high wire and much more!

Yeah, just doing a split on an ironing board held by 2 guys biking on a tightrope…what r u up to? (Photo credit Mark Turner)

The award-winning team of puppeteers and model makers who created the National Theatre’s War Horse will design, build and bring to life two stunningly beautiful elephants for CIRCUS 1903 –The Golden Age of Circus. Featuring groundbreaking advances in design and expression, the puppets appear throughout the show as the mother teaches her calf the tricks of the trade.

I cannot wait to see this live! (Photo credit: Mark Turner

Giveaway: I’m giving away 4 tickets to the show! Wednesday, March 8 at 7:00 p.m., BOCH CENTER WANG THEATRE in Boston. If you can make that show, jump into the giveaway! If you can’t, see below to get a 25% discount on tickets!

To win tickets: I’m doing this via Rafflecopter. It’s very easy, and you have several options to choose from.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Discount Code: Save 25% on tickets to see CIRCUS 1903 – The Golden Age of Circus  at the Boch Wang Theatre!  Visit  http://www.bochcenter.org/buy/show-listing/circus-1903  and enter code MOMS to buy your discounted tickets.  Discount applies to all performances, while supplies last. Valid on all levels, excluding Orchestra Pit.

Tickets: In any case, tickets are on sale at the Boch Center box office, through www.bochcenter.org or by calling (866) 348-9738.

Social Media: Follow CIRCUS 1903 –The Golden Age of Circus on Twitter: @Circus1903, Facebook and Instagram: @Circus1903.

 

Staying Fueled With Stonyfield Organic Whole Milk Smoothies

I’ll admit it: We eat between meals. I’m more in the six-small-meals-a-day camp, so I tend to graze. And the kids get hungry between lunch and dinner, after at least an hour of playground time after school. Who can blame them?

And they need to stay fueled for everything else, such as fort building,

ice skating,

homework, and more.

We don’t eat junk food, though. Our snacks tend to be veggies and hummus, cheese and crackers, fruit, nuts, or the occasional granola bar. A bowl of plain whole milk yogurt with a drizzle of maple syrup is something they sometimes enjoy, too.

My younger son sometimes begs me to buy him the brightly colored yogurt drinks at the store, but I rarely do. Then Stonyfield send me some of their new Organic Whole Milk Smoothies.

Hello there!

I’ve long eschewed the low-fat trend (I also refuse to make any recipe with “skinny” in the name). The texture of low-fat foods was never quite right. Let’s face it, fat tastes good! It improves mouthfeel, whether you’re talking about yogurt, cheese, a muffin — you name it.

Also, I never quite believed (as an adult) that lowering our fat intake was necessarily helpful. We never did switch the kids to skim milk (yuck). Turns out my instinct was right — fat isn’t horrible for you and doesn’t lead, on its own, to obesity. Plus, fat keeps you full longer.

Anyway. These whole milk smoothies are now available in Strawberry and Peach. They’re good! My kids like both but have a slight preference for strawberry. They come in four-packs, with each bottle containing six ounces. Each bottle has 7 grams of fat and 6 grams of protein. With 16 grams of sugar, they have more added sugar than I’d like, but sometimes that’s OK. They’re gluten-free, organic, and non-GMO.

I make smoothies for the kid almost every morning (Stonyfield plain whole milk yogurt, fruit, juice, protein powder). These organic whole milk smoothies are a quick alternative for days when we’re rushed, or good for an after-school snack (or a midmorning snack for me). I might also try adding one to a smoothie I’m making to sweeten it up a little.

Thanks for going full fat, Stonyfield!